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August 5, 2019

Goodbye “keto” diet.  Hello “plant-based” diet!  As a Registered Dietitian, I couldn’t be more pleased with the latest diet trend, because it isn’t actually a “diet”, it is a healthy, balanced way of eating that just makes sense.  So what is a plant-based diet anyway?  Many people interpret a plant-based diet as being vegetarian or vegan, but this isn’t the case.  Although a plant-based diet is mostly made up of food from plants such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains and plant proteins such as legumes, lentils, nut/seeds and their butters and soy products such as tofu, it can actually contain moderate amounts of fish, poultry, lean meat, lower fat dairy products and eggs.

One of reasons the plant-based diet is becoming so popular is because this way of eating has been shown to prevent and manage chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and certain types of cancer and also help with weight management.  This diet is a rich source of fibre, vita...

April 24, 2019

Snacks can be a healthy addition to your three daily meals and a way of getting some of the nutrients you may have missed at mealtime.  If you feel like grabbing a snack between meals, ask yourself first if you are truly hungry or if you are eating because you are feeling bored, lonely, anxious, angry, happy, sad or stressed.  If you are hungry, choose a snack that will energize you, nourish your body, and help you feel satisfied until your next meal.  If you think you are craving a snack for reasons other than hunger, do something to distract yourself like doing a crossword puzzle/craft or going for a walk.

Tips for Choosing a Healthy snack

  • For a nutrient-packed snack, include a serving from 1 or 2 of the food groups from Canada's Food Guide.

  • Choose whole, non-processed foods more often. 

  • Include a source of protein and/or healthy fats such as nuts, seeds, nut butter, hummus, hard-cooked egg, tuna, avocado or lower fat dairy products such...

January 28, 2018

Omega-3 fatty acids are types of polyunsaturated fats.  They have gained a lot of attention because of their many health benefits such as heart health, lowering triglycerides and their effect on brain, nerve and eye development in children of pregnant and breastfeeding women.  There is also ongoing research to determine the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids for inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis; cognitive disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and dementia; mental health disorders including depression and anxiety; and certain types of cancer, however this is not yet conclusive.

There are 3 types of omega-3 fatty acids:  alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexanoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA).

Our bodies do not produce these omega-3 fatty acids, so it is essential to get them through diet or a supplement.

Fatty fish such as, salmon, mackerel, herring, trout, sardines and arctic char are great sources of the most beneficial ty...

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Nutrition Pathway

323 Kerr St., Suite 209

Oakville, Ontario, L6K 3B6

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